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Archive for May 20th, 2008

In the movie “Prince Caspian”, conflict and near ruin come because two important characters clash. The first character, Peter, is the oldest of four and was once the high king of Narnia. The other character, Caspian, is an orphaned, only child, who has had his throne robbed. The clash comes when Caspian, who’s the one who positioned his troops in and around Aslan’s How, wants to stay and defend his stronghold. However, Peter wants Caspian to move his army to attack the Telmarine’s castle. Caspian feels jealousy for Peter’s already-stated authority, feeling that he should command his own army. In the end he gives in to Peter’s plan. While the plan is already underway, Caspian decides to change Peter’s plans, feeling that his role is too small, by saving Doctor Cornelius. Caspian, after nearly killing his uncle, Miraz, gets a horse for himself, the Doctor, and one for Peter. Peter, thinking that his own skill and valor can win the battle, hangs on to that feeling at the cost of ‘his’ troops. Peter, finally seeing that the battle is lost, calls a retreat, but part of ‘his’ army gets trapped and killed by the Telmarines. When they get back to Aslan’s How, Peter and Caspian flare violently at each other. Peter, who feels the blow to his selfish pride, is somewhat humbled by his loss of his self-glory in the losing of a battle. He is angry at his own mistakes and Caspian’s, and he takes his anger out on Caspian. Caspian is angry at the loss of his troops, and thinking it useful he points out in a very bad tempered way that if they had followed his plan his troops would still be alive. Both Peter and Caspian are brave, skillful warriors, noble in action and speech and have taken upon themselves great responsibility. Peter loves his brother and sisters and the land of Narnia, but he is somewhat proud. Up until recently Caspian has not felt love for anyone except Doctor Cornelius. Caspian is somewhat bad tempered. In the end both Peter and Caspian are humbled. Peter is humbled when Edmund, not him, shatters the chance of the White Witch’s return, and when Susan and Lucy remind him that Aslan is the way to victory. Caspian is humbled when he realizes that his hate is destroying him. In the very end Caspian regains his rightful throne and Peter returns to his own world. The conflict was resolved when Peter forgives Caspian and lets him keep the High King’s sword.

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